Report 2012-111 Recommendations

When an audit is completed and a report is issued, auditees must provide the State Auditor with information regarding their progress in implementing recommendations from our reports at three intervals from the release of the report: 60 days, six months, and one year. Additionally, Senate Bill 1452 (Chapter 452, Statutes of 2006), requires auditees who have not implemented recommendations after one year, to report to us and to the Legislature why they have not implemented them or to state when they intend to implement them. Below, is a listing of each recommendation the State Auditor made in the report referenced and a link to the most recent response from the auditee addressing their progress in implementing the recommendation and the State Auditor's assessment of auditee's response based on our review of the supporting documentation.

Recommendations in Report 2012-111: California Department of Public Health: It Needs to Improve Accuracy in Accounting and Charging for Compliance Inspections Designed to Reduce Youth Access to Tobacco and It Could Enhance Its Compliance Inspections (Release Date: June 2013)

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Recommendations to Public Health, Department of
Number Recommendation Status
1

To ensure that it can support its labor costs, Public Health should implement a process to accurately track the time its staff spends conducting statewide and local compliance inspections.

Fully Implemented
2

It should allocate expenses associated with statewide and local compliance inspections to the appropriate funding source, based on the time staff spends conducting those activities, and it should maintain accurate accounting records to reflect actual costs of statewide and local compliance inspections.

Fully Implemented
3

When Public Health enters into new contracts with local entities to conduct compliance inspections, it should evaluate its historical costs of conducting these inspections to ensure that the existing rates are adequate to recoup its costs. If it determines that the existing rates are not adequate, it should develop a new rate that accurately reflects its true costs.

Fully Implemented
4

When Public Health enters into new contracts with local entities to conduct compliance inspections, it should ensure that it maintains adequate documented support for the rate it charges for a compliance inspection.

Fully Implemented
5

Public Health should amend its recent contract with the city of Los Angeles to correct the rate it charges for a local compliance inspection to reflect its true cost.

Fully Implemented
6

To ensure that Public Health can more effectively monitor and enforce compliance with the STAKE Act, it should take appropriate steps to ensure that there are no restrictions placed on the use of the data acquired during the annual retailer assessment that would preclude its use for compliance inspection purposes.

Fully Implemented
7

To ensure that Public Health can more effectively monitor and enforce compliance with the STAKE Act, it should annually obtain the identifying information regarding the retailers that sold tobacco to minors during the annual retailer assessment and provide that information to the Food and Drug Branch.

Fully Implemented
8

To ensure that Public Health can more effectively monitor and enforce compliance with the STAKE Act, it should include the retailers that sold tobacco to minors during the annual retailer assessment when selecting the retailers it plans to inspect as part of the statewide compliance inspections.

Fully Implemented
9

Public Health should add language to its youth decoy and parent or legal guardian consent form to clarify that the data obtained from the youth's participation may be used in future research in a way that will not reveal the identity of the youth.

Fully Implemented


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